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Hunting History: Rare relic hunt draws crowd
by L.A. Story
Apr 01, 2017 | 1721 views | 0 0 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Keith Murphy (from left), Brayden Price and Johnny Muston, all of Muscle Shoals, Ala., drove to Farmington Saturday morning for the opportunity to metal detect on the city's new proposed park property. Metal detecting was allowed, with a purchased permit, for one day with proceeds benefiting the park. / Staff Photo by L.A. Story
Keith Murphy (from left), Brayden Price and Johnny Muston, all of Muscle Shoals, Ala., drove to Farmington Saturday morning for the opportunity to metal detect on the city's new proposed park property. Metal detecting was allowed, with a purchased permit, for one day with proceeds benefiting the park. / Staff Photo by L.A. Story
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FARMINGTON — Saturday saw a cool spring morning filled with the sounds of blowing winds, buzzing insects, chirping birds ... and beeping metal detectors.

Vehicles lined both sides of the road out from the entrance to Farmington’s proposed park site as relic hunters and metal detecting enthusiasts were allowed the rare opportunity to metal detect on city property for a single day.

Farmington City Clerk Debbie Jackson said they had issued over 100 one-day permits for the relic hunt with proceeds from the temporary permit sales going to support the park.

“We have people from all over over,” said Jackson. She said permits were purchased from people from more southern regions of Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana.

Mayor Dale Fortenberry expressed satisfaction with the strong turnout. He said it was the first time the city had ever had a relic hunt and he was happy with the results.

“People started showing up early,” said Alderman Johnny Potts, who displayed the relics found during the early part of the morning. There were several Civil War bullets among the items discovered.

As relic hunters roamed the property, which has been cleared in the past weeks for development of the park, Fortenberry pointed out the site were there will be a veterans memorial. He spoke of the amphitheater where there would be a variety of music performances and singings.

The city acquired the land in October 2016 and announced plans to build a municipal park.

Located off County Road 206 also known as the Kimberly-Clark Parkway, the pastoral 24-acre property will soon be developed with a walking trail, veterans memorial garden, pavilion and restrooms. It is located across from the Joel Bridges property where there is a lake alongside the road.
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