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City continues property cleanup
by Jebb Johnston
May 26, 2016 | 253 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tall grass is keeping Corinth code enforcement busy. The mowing season brings a big increase in the number of properties the city is requesting to be cleaned up, and this spring is no exception. The last session of the Board of Aldermen included action on 39 properties that were either before the board for a public hearing or had a new public hearing scheduled. “The majority of these are repeaters,” said Code Enforcement Officer Kim Ratliff. In many cases, the houses are unoccupied, and the lawns quickly become overgrown when warmer weather arrives. Once the board votes to take action on a property and the work is completed, the cost is added to the property tax bill. And if they end up in the property tax sale for unpaid taxes, it can make them less attractive to buyers because “they are building up a bigger tab every year,” said Ratliff. With that in mind, the city tries to be as cost-effective as possible with the mowing costs, he said. The board scheduled adjudication hearings for 5 p.m. June 7 for properties at 1123 Madison, 1509 Washington, 5832 Douglas, 1002 Douglas, 1901 Parkway, 100 Montgomery, 1408 Cruise, 1424 Cruise, 605 South Parkway and 1609 Linden. Also included are properties without a specific address listed as East Fifth Street, Washington Street and two others on Cruise Street. The board voted to adjudicate properties at 1103 Tate, 1502 Tate, 1108 Ross, 1002 Ross, 1703 Meadows, 1917 Princess Ann and six others that are empty lots. By adjudicating, the city can proceed with having the lots mowed. Continued to June 21 are 303 Young, 1002 Meigg, 1221 White and 1501 Bunch. Continued to June 7 are 1606 Droke and an empty lot with no address given. The board dismissed action on 1422 Wick, 1216 Meigg, 1410 Pinecrest, 1908 Princess Ann, 1505 Bunch and a lot at the northwest corner of Childs and Polk.
Staff photo by Steve Beavers | Don Nielsen (left) was among five speakers during the CREATE Foundation’s Commission on the Future of Northeast Mississippi on Thursday.
Staff photo by Steve Beavers | Don Nielsen (left) was among five speakers during the CREATE Foundation’s Commission on the Future of Northeast Mississippi on Thursday.
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Nielsen tells CREATE about education plan
by Steve Beavers
May 26, 2016 | 197 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff photo by Steve Beavers | Don Nielsen (left) was among five speakers during the CREATE Foundation’s Commission on the Future of Northeast Mississippi on Thursday.
Staff photo by Steve Beavers | Don Nielsen (left) was among five speakers during the CREATE Foundation’s Commission on the Future of Northeast Mississippi on Thursday.
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TUPELO — Don Nielsen has a plan of action. The Senior Fellow of Discovery Institute and chair of the Institute’s program on public education reform outlined the strategy Thursday during the CREATE Foundation’s Commission on the Future of Northeast Mississippi at the BancorpSouth Center. Nielsen was among five individuals who spoke on the various topics of Transforming Education, Linking Education to Careers, Mississippi’s Highways and Bridges and State of the Region. “The only difference between education today and when it was established in 1904 is the building,” said Nielsen. “In my mind, our education system has become obsolete … we are not effectively educating our children.” Nielsen concentrated his activities on public education from 1992 to 2008. He traveled the country for two years studying America’s public education system and subsequently was elected to the Board of the Seattle Public Schools. Nielsen, currently Chairman of Lumenal Lighting, LLC., pointed out several things which pertain to education have risen in the United States. Items such as drop outs, underclass, poverty, incarceration rates, debt and medical costs. “If we want to fix any of these problems, the fastest way is to educate our children,” he said. Nielsen’s book – “Every School” – covers fundamentally changing the public education system so it works for every school and every student. “If we want to fix teaching, we have to get rid of certification laws,” he said. “We need a plan of action and it’s not something which will happen overnight.” Nielsen said “we need” to do 10 things to improve education. 1. Replace certification standards 2. Get rid of elected school boards 3. Build an institute for educational leaders 4. Establish innovation schools and districts 5. Fund innovation schools based on student needs 6. Eliminate the salary schedule 7. Set school day and year based upon achievement 8. Give parents and students choices 9. Change graduation requirements – on performance and not hours 10. Set standards, not curriculum “The greatest gift you can give your children is a fixed school,” said Nielsen. “It’s what you can also give America.” CREATE President Mike Clayborne was impressed with Nielsen’s plan. “That was the most thought-provoking address I have heard in a long time,” said Clayborne. “Mississippi has a lot of right ingredients to make a change … the movers and shakers we have in this room can get things done.” Mississippi Economic Council President/CEO Blake Wilson updated attendees on bridges and highways in the state. “Every Mississippian deserves a safe and reliable transportation system,” said Wilson. According to Wilson, 936 state bridges and 24,591 lane miles of state roads – the primary routes which connect communities to the nation and world – aren’t able to hold up to the traffic and weights for which they were designed and for what is needed to serve the economic development needs of the state. “Mississippi is falling far behind by standing still,” said Wilson. “Every day we wait, our costs go up.” For an investment of about 37 cents a day, Mississippians over time – as the program is completed – will receive a return of about $1.45 a day in reduced driving costs, according to Wilson. “Ignoring our problem will close off economic development opportunities,” said Wilson. “It’s time to get active on this project and make it happen together.” Corinth School District Superintendent Lee Childress was recognized by Commission Chairman Guy W. Mitchell III. “Our primary goal is increasing per capita income in the area and improving education attainment is our focus,” said Mitchell. Mitchell went on to tell the audience the Commission accomplished its objective of having two public school districts in Northeast Mississippi apply for District of Innovation. Booneville and Corinth both applied. Corinth was selected as one of the first three districts awarded the status in Mississippi. “Corinth’s plans are exciting and we look forward to them leading the way,” said Mitchell. CREATE serves as the financial administrator for nonprofit organizations and community projects. It allows organizations to minimize cost and more fully meet philanthropic and service purposes without having the burden of administrative expenses. CREATE places emphasis on the four program areas of regional capacity building, endowment building, financial administration and targeted grant making. For regional capacity building, CREATE provides support for the Commission on the Future of Northeast Mississippi, to local development organizations and leadership development.
April jobless rate follows state trend
by Jebb Johnston
May 26, 2016 | 137 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Alcorn County unemployment was 4.5 percent in April, following the state trend of a slight decrease for the month. The county was at 4.8 percent in March and 4.9 percent a year earlier. Mississippi’s not seasonally adjusted rate for the month was 5 percent, down from 5.6 percent in March and 5.7 percent a year earlier, according to figures released Wednesday by the Mississippi Department of Employment Security. The county had 720 categorized as unemployed in April, compared to 770 in March and 780 a year earlier. First-time claims for unemployment insurance in the county numbered 62, down slightly from 71 in March and 75 a year earlier. Continued claims numbered 345, compared to 353 in March and 343 a year earlier. Rates across the state ranged from 3.4 percent in Rankin County to 14.4 percent in Issaquena County. Alcorn ranked 12th among the 82 counties. Mississippi’s not seasonally adjusted non-farm employment increased 3,800 over the month and 12,900 from one year ago. Industry sectors registering the largest monthly employment gains were leisure & hospitality and professional & business services. Nineteen states had notable unemployment rate decreases from a year earlier; two states had increases; and 29 states and the District had no notable net change, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. The national jobless rate was unchanged from March at 5.0 percent and was 0.4 percentage point lower than in April 2015.
The Resident Bishop of Mississippi will formally dedicate Indian Springs UMC on Sunday.
The Resident Bishop of Mississippi will formally dedicate Indian Springs UMC on Sunday.
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